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Photo Info

Dimensions3185 x 2120
Original file size6.18 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken9-Aug-16 22:46
Date modified10-Aug-16 09:35
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D4
Focal length14 mm
Focal length (35mm)14 mm
Max lens aperturef/2.8
Exposure20s at f/2.8
FlashNot fired
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeManual
Exposure prog.Manual
ISO speedISO 2000
Metering modePattern
Digital zoom1x
Plymouth Buglight Setting Moon

Plymouth Buglight Setting Moon

It took over a year of planning and scheduling to get out to the Plymouth Buglight in Plymouth Harbor, Massachusetts. I began talking to the harbormaster in the summer of 2015 of the plans to shoot with the water tripod in the middle of the channel. Timing had to be perfect with both the new moon phase and a low tide in order to avoid vibrating the tripod from the strong current that flows in and out of the harbor. However, on this night the moon was in its later phase and it was to set at the same time as slack tide when it switches from going out to coming back in. The navigational charts show an area of about two feet of water at low tide though we never found water to be that shallow. Since the tripod can work up to 18 feet, I knew we could get the shot, but like all of the water lighthouses, I never know what the bottom is like until arriving at the location. We got lucky here because it has a nice flat sandy bottom. We secured the whaler with three anchors to stabilize it in the current and then light painted the tower with an LED flashlight while shooting. I brought LED stand lights and had planned to send my assistant off and away from the whaler to light the lighthouse from the side, but the currents were too strong and I was reluctant to push it harder given the strong current. We got some great images and returned safely to the dock. The harbormaster had kept its patrols near to us in case we ran into any issues. Back at the dock I had to wait over an hour for higher tide to return to pull the boat.
August 9, 2016 10:49pm
Nikon D4 14mm lens ISO2000 f2.8 20secs