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Photo Info

Dimensions4550 x 2724
Original file size9.04 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken27-Jun-17 00:35
Date modified27-Jun-17 06:52
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeNIKON CORPORATION
Camera modelNIKON D4
Focal length14 mm
Focal length (35mm)14 mm
Max lens aperturef/2.8
Exposure25s at f/2.8
FlashNot fired
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeManual
Exposure prog.Manual
ISO speedISO 5000
Metering modePattern
Digital zoom1x
Orient Point

Orient Point

A popular southern New England getaway to Long Island is on the New London to Orient Point ferry. As it pulls into the Orient Point docks it passes close to the lighthouse first built in 1874 though that structure was destroyed by ice in 1896. The current tower is a “spark-plug” style similar to several others in the country and was completed in 1899. It is now private and I’d contacted its owner about a year before this visit and gained permission to get onto the riprap surrounding the lighthouse. Knowing the currents were particularly strong, a local fishing captain who often is hired by the owner for transportation to the lighthouse was contracted for this shoot. Captain Bob knew his Orient currents like none other and it became apparent as we approached the lighthouse in total darkness under star-filled new moon skies. The current was ripping through the gut and Bob’s assistant Mike snagged the metal ladder with a dock line as I started tossing gear up on the grated landing. Once I’d scampered up the ladder, Bob carefully pulled away though Sean, also along for the evening adventure, admitted later they made “soft” contact with the hull on the rocks. It was a hairy situation as they made their way away from the tower to a spot about a hundred feet away to light the scene. I worked several different angles but was restricted by the rocks around the lighthouse and found it difficult to get a decent wide shot. It quickly became obvious the best angle would have to be straight up to capture the Milky Way now present in its summer glory. With little ambient light in this area of eastern Long Island it was plainly in view to the naked eye. The disembarking was equally as crazy and the boat came extremely close to again hitting the rocks but Bob deftly maneuvered and we safely made our way back to the dock.
Orient Point, New York June 27, 2017 12:35pm 67° 10-15mph wind
Nikon D4, 14mm lens ISO 5000 f2.8 25secs